Patient-Centered Care Webinar

Organizing the delivery of health care around the needs of the patient may seem like a simple and obvious approach. In a system, as complex as health care, however, little is simple. There is increasing evidence that health care providers who put the patient at the centre of the care they provide have a unique comparative advantage. The 21st century healthcare should be safe, effective, patient-centred, timely, efficient and equitable, according to the U.S. Institute of Medicine. In Nigeria and Ghana, the last decade has seen economic growth and the emergence of a more discerning middle class, who with access to the internet and global travel are demanding more from their healthcare providers. The future belongs to healthcare providers who recognise and respond to these developments. Without patients, there would be no need for health workers. As “clients” and buyers of health services their rights and preferences should be taken into consideration when they visit health facilities to procure health services. Health workers in Nigeria and Ghana will need to offer a more professional and client-focused service. This one-day webinar is part of patient-centered care course series by EpiAFRIC, which are usually paid courses. However, this webinar is free. Interested participants in Nigeria and Ghana should apply by clicking on “register” button below. Part of the requirements is an essay on what patient-centered care means to you. Twenty (20) successful applicants from Nigeria and Ghana will be selected to participate.

FacultyRegister
Dr. Ifeanyi McWilliams Nsofor

Dr. Ifeanyi McWilliams Nsofor

CEO EpiAFRIC

Dr. Ifeanyi McWilliams Nsofor is a graduate of Nnamdi Azikiwe University Medical School and the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. He is a Senior New Voices Fellow at the Aspen Institute and a Senior Atlantic Fellow for Health Equity at George Washington University. He is a leading advocate for universal health care. Ifeanyi’s health communications and health advocacy efforts are hinged on the University of Global Health Equity’s mantra that, to achieve equity in healthcare, there must be equity in health education. Ifeanyi is a Thought Leader in Global Health. He has written over 55 opinion pieces for different publishers including, The Hill, BioMed Central’s Bugbitten Blog, Scientific American, Project Syndicate, Devex and others. Ifeanyi is a TEDx Speaker – his 2018 TEDxOguiRoad Talk is titled, “Without Health, We Have Nothing”. In March 2020, Ifeanyi spoke at “Exploring Media Ecosystems Conference” at the Samberg Center of Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Title of his talk was “Forward this to 10 People: The epidemic of health misinformation in Nigeria”. The Conference was organized by Media Cloud – a joint project by the MIT Center for Civic Media & the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University. In March 2020, Ifeanyi was recognized among the Coronavirus Top 100 healthcare professionals globally by Onalytica.

Dr. Elliot Koranteng Tannor

Dr. Elliot Koranteng Tannor

Consultant Nephrologist, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana

Dr. Elliot Koranteng Tannor is a Senior Atlantic Fellow for Health Equity at George Washington University. He is a Senior Specialist Physician, a Nephrologist and an Adjunct Lecturer of the School of Medical Sciences in Kumasi, Ghana. He is a Fellow of both the West African College of Physicians and the International Society of Nephrology. As a Strategic Management Consultant, researcher, health promotor and educator, Elliot is passionate about kidney disease prevention in Ghana and Africa. He has written articles that have been published in peer review journals, online media portals, and has been featured in countless churches, radio and television stations programs advocating on the prevention of kidney disease in Ghana. One of his recent articles reviews the coronavirus pandemic and kidney disease in Ghana. In this article, he establishes the link between COVID-19 and kidney diseases, showing that patients with chronic kidney disease and transplant patients are at risk of increased mortality as a result of decreased immunity. He organizes free health screening for disadvantaged populations and educates all on kidney disease prevention as most of his patients are unable to afford kidney disease treatment due to health inequity. His vision is to see a health sector devoid of health inequity.